Reviews

Brand new review of “Into The Night”

“A most interesting pop-oriented album that transports the listener into the deepest and darkest regions of the time after sundown… songs like “San Francisco” do a great job of incorporating the sounds of that city after dark…Ameet’s vocals are infused with the kind of energy that make the music come across as far more than “just pop”… that’s his strongest point… he’s able to guide the listener into the spaces he sings about…”

by Dick Metcalf.

Read the entire review here

2016-07-24T17:50:14+00:00

by Dick Metcalf.

Read the entire review here

“A most interesting pop-oriented album that transports the listener into the deepest and darkest regions of the time after sundown… songs like “San Francisco” do a great job of incorporating the sounds of that city after dark…Ameet’s vocals are infused with the kind of energy that make the music come across as far more than “just pop”… that’s his strongest point… he’s able to guide the listener into the spaces he sings about…”

Indian immigrant’s debut offering bridges East-West musical divide

For a change, the voice of the Indian diaspora is now being heard, albeit without the expected, ubiquitous sitar and tabla. Mumbai-born and US-based musician Ameet Kamath recently released his debut album, Greasy Rails, in New York, breaking new grounds in bridging the popular divide of the music of the East and the West.

Talking about his debut offering with The Sentinel, Ameet says, “Greasy Rails is about coming to terms with what matters in life. It’s about refusing to take anything less than what you’ve been seeking.” He adds, “In it, I’m telling stories so that the listeners can understand life as I do – constantly negotiating spaces as an immigrant in the 21st century.” The language he chooses to narrate his stories in, however, is pure global rock.

Having been born and grown up in Mumbai, Ameet’s tryst with music began as a member of a school choir. But then came the wave of western pop – in the form of Beatles, ABBA and Queen – which left an impact more far-reaching than anyone ever imagined.

It was this infatuation that brought him to the West. And once there, living in New York and San Francisco, what he grew into and found was a way to give voice to his experience of the modern, young, Indian diaspora—not the stereotype of the immigrant Indian cab driver or doctor—in the musical language he’d come to love. “I wanted to be an Indian vocalist who told his stories through Western pop. How hard is that to imagine? Pretty hard, I guess, from the reactions I used to get when listeners didn’t hear any tabla or sitar. But the musical language is the same, what we have as garba-dandiya music for example is actually just music in 12 8 time signature for example. I’ve incorporated more rhythms than actual Indian instrumentation, so it’s a bit more subtle than overt.”

Ameet went to the US as a “techie” in 1995. But it was only after he moved to New York after a couple of years that he began to immerse himself in jazz and began performing the American songbook whenever and wherever he could — at weddings, street corners, parks, cafes, and bars. His persistence paid off with a jazz-pop residency at the notorious Marion’s Continental on Bowery, where the patrons and fans encouraged him to set his own story to song. Needing to find inspiration for his original material, he set off on a creative quest across the country that landed him in San Francisco. It was there that he conceived Greasy Rails; the ensuing material was written and composed over the next two years.

A musician whose honest storytelling is set to pop-rock music, his first offering is pure global rock that gets up-close and personal. “I didn’t want to be another Indian crossover singer. If my music crosses over anything, it’s from pop to folk-rock.”

Those, for him, are the global, barrier-breaking languages.
2015-09-15T19:38:37+00:00
No space for the Tabla and Sitar in Ameet’s ‘global rock’

Greasy Rails – Grant Road Records

"Enough" is a cool song about needing to slow down in this hectic world. The tune is suitably frantic in its pace and the vocal uneasy. "San Francisco" is a lovely paean to Kamath's hometown and it has a catchy and memorable tune. "Can I Have Some Of It?" betrays an Indian influence in the melody, and the words tell a story of an immigrant trying to fit in. It's an affecting and strong song. The title track has a cool swing to it, and some truly affecting words about the big city life. Ameet Kamath's debut is a truly memorable one.

By: Anna Maria Stjärnell, http://www.lunakafe.com/
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2015-09-15T19:17:33+00:00

By: Anna Maria Stjärnell, http://www.lunakafe.com/
View Original Review

Ameet Kamath's debut album betrays many influences. His vocal is always assured though, and his songs are strong....Ameet Kamath's debut is a truly memorable one.

Soft and contemporary

Soft and contemporary, Ameet Kamath’s lyrics are about real life situations.  Born in Mumbai Middle East] and raised in San Francisco, CA, Kamath angles his music to bring the East and West together, infusing jazz and soft rock together to form a soft pop sound that is perfect to fall asleep to or throw on at a networking mixer.  Throw this album in your mom’s Christmas stocking and you will see her smile.  There are songs about SF, love and “Greasy Rails;” hence the album title name.
2015-09-15T19:33:21+00:00
Soft and contemporary, Ameet Kamath’s lyrics are about real life situations. Born in Mumbai Middle East] and raised in San Francisco, CA, Kamath angles his music to bring the East and West together...

Very interesting debut from a new singer songwriter

I bought this out of curiosity after it was recommended to me. It's hard to categorize this oddly named album, it covers such a diversity of musical styles from an energetic rock/pop reminiscent of U2 to funky soul and folky ballads. There's even a track that sounds almost like Wham in their fabulously coiffed heyday. This eclecticism might put off some listeners, those who liked a specific track and were expecting variations on the same theme. I have to say, for me, it just seemed instead to demonstrate Kamath's considerable talent and apparently limitless adaptability. Basically he pulls off each of the disparate styles pretty effortlessly. This is all self-penned original work, no covers in sight. The arrangements are great, his voice is one of the best male voices I've heard in a while: rich, mellow, resonant with an impressive range. His vocal talent might be best appreciated in the slower, more soulful tracks like `Free' or in the funkier `San Francisco' or poppy `Give it Up'. However, I think his song-writing talent is probably best demonstrated by the grittier rock numbers like the title track `Enough' or `Can I have Some of It?"

Most of the tracks here reward repeated listening. The lyrics are a real strength, despite occasionally slipping into a cloying sentimentality or perilously close to melodrama on the slower ballads, they are never less than interesting to listen out for. At any rate, the lyrics here are certainly streaks ahead of the generic, brain-numbing, vacuous oohyeahbabys we are bombarded with regularly. I found myself concentrating on the narrative in the songs when I should have been working when I'd only put the album on for background. I also found myself toe-tapping to more than one number and then humming a few of them later as I went about my day. Overall, this is a pretty impressive debut and it's made me very curious to see what this artist follows it up with and what else he decides to experiment with. I debated whether to go for 4 or 5 stars (any less just seemed churlish). I decided that in this instance 4 stars would only have been because not all of the tracks are in musical genres that I like, in other words a reflection of my own taste rather than a fair appraisal of the craftsmanship and skill on display here. So I have rather surprised myself by giving it 5 stars. Whatever your preferred musical genre, it's certainly gratifying to hear a genuine artist at work rather than some pre-packaged, skinny-young-thing lip-synching to something they didn't write.

By: Amazon Reader (UK)
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2015-09-15T19:20:39+00:00

By: Amazon Reader (UK)
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I have to say, for me, it just seemed instead to demonstrate Kamath's considerable talent and apparently limitless adaptability.

“A poetic George Michael” – Babs Johnson

2016-02-25T03:44:53+00:00

Bridging the East – West divide

Mumbai-born and US-based musician Ameet Kamath recently released his debut album, Greasy Rails, in New York, breaking new grounds in bridging the popular divide of the music of the East and the West.

Says Ameet, “Greasy Rails is about coming to terms with what matters in life. It’s about refusing to take anything less than what you’ve been seeking.” He adds, “In it, I’m telling stories so that the listeners can understand life as I do – constantly negotiating spaces as an immigrant in the 21st century.” The language he chooses to narrate his stories in, however, is pure global rock.

Ameet went to the US as a techie in 1995. But it was only after he moved to New York after some years that he began to immerse himself in jazz and began performing the American songbook whenever and wherever he could — at weddings, street corners, parks, cafes, and bars. His persistence paid off with a jazz-pop residency at the notorious Marion’s Continental on Bowery, where the patrons and fans encouraged him to set his own story to song. Needing to find inspiration for his original material, he set off on a creative quest across the country that landed him in San Francisco. It was there that he conceived Greasy Rails; the ensuing material was written and composed over the next two years.
2015-09-15T19:35:56+00:00
Mumbai-born and US-based musician Ameet Kamath recently released his debut album, Greasy Rails, in New York, breaking new grounds in bridging the popular divide of the music of the East and the West.